Hard to Ignore

by Belinda Munoz on December 14, 2010

cold outside warm inside

A cup of hot cocoa
Marshmallows on top
Fire of crackling orange and blue
Comfort from fingers to toes.

Not a trickle of rain or snow
No blistering whipping winds
No cops accosting sleeping limbs
Inside a cozy warm home.

Soft bed swallows worries whole.
Outside, a man settles in a dark corner
Toting life-in-a-cart on wobbly wet wheels
Seeking refuge for weary mind and body.

Each year, mathematics fails
To ration equal tidings of good cheer
Mixing a touch of bitter with sweet
To the festive holiday spirit.

This is for One Shot Wednesday.

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If the cold weather has inspired you to send a little help to the homelessless this winter, I bet they’d be grateful to hear from you.  Shelter Listings has a list of shelters by state in the U.S.

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Image by Etolane

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December 14, 2010 at 9:37 pm

{ 23 comments… read them below or add one }

1 ayala December 14, 2010 at 4:37 pm

A beautiful poem, Belinda. You succeed to inspire once again!

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2 Belinda December 15, 2010 at 8:55 am

Thank you, Ayala. Not enough shelters for them when it gets cold out.

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3 marousia December 14, 2010 at 4:48 pm

ooo, I want to be in your poem – perfect coziness 🙂

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4 Lauren December 14, 2010 at 4:59 pm

What a beautiful way to allow us to consider how fortunate we are. So gentle, yet profound.

You’re poem is a wonderful holiday gift.

Love,
Lauren

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5 Belinda December 15, 2010 at 8:57 am

Thanks, Lauren. It’s a huge problem here, as you may know.

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6 Jingle December 14, 2010 at 5:25 pm

Each year, mathematics fails
To ration equal tidings of good cheer
Mixing a touch of bitter with sweet
To the festive holiday spirit…

well put.
thanks for sharing such extraordinary poetry with the world.

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7 Giovanni Cucullo December 14, 2010 at 6:32 pm

A healthy reminder about those less fortunate; not all of us are lucky enough to live in a cozy warm house like the one pictured and the photo presents us with such a moving counterpoint.
Thank You Belinda!

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8 Belinda December 15, 2010 at 9:00 am

You’re right,Giovanni. I myself sometimes become numb to this reality.

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9 Chris G. December 14, 2010 at 9:52 pm

Mmm, I could go for a good cup of cocoa myself right now. An easy, cozy little poem that makes one ready to go enjoy the season of hibernation. Yet it also touches on an unfortunate truth, as we settle into that coziness, there are others that do not have such an option…how fortunate we are. A beautiful tribute to those less fortunate.

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10 Claudia December 15, 2010 at 9:51 am

oh i love this – i love the pic and the words – they spread warmth – and i would like to move in there…and lie down in the soft bed that swallows my worries whole..sigh

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11 Eric Alder December 15, 2010 at 10:13 am

“Soft bed swallows worries whole” – a wonderful description of the way we lose our troubling thoughts amidst the luxury of having a soft bed to sleep in. (Which, in contrast, others cannot) Thoughtful One Shot, Belinda.

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12 Diana Lee December 15, 2010 at 12:08 pm

Incredibly comforting and incredibly heartbreaking all at the same time.

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13 Steve Isaak December 15, 2010 at 12:44 pm

emotionally warm, winter-centric work.

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14 SuziCate December 15, 2010 at 2:21 pm

Beautiful. Your last stanza tells the truth of it. It is really cold right now, can’t imagine being out in the elements for long periods of time. Hoping they all find a warm place to rest their heads this holiday season.

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15 Laura Hegfield December 15, 2010 at 3:43 pm

so sad and unfair…and true. beautiful.

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16 katie December 15, 2010 at 5:30 pm

Lovely poem, Belinda. And yes, we must not forget those who are not blessed with warmth and coziness. I count my blessings every time I nestle into my bed. Hard to imagine what it must be like to sleep on the street, but not so hard to lend a helping hand. Thank you for the reminder.

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17 Michael Yost December 15, 2010 at 9:08 pm

In my addiction I was homeless for the holidays one year and I cannot express the feelings of hopelessness and despair. Give what you can when and if the opportunity comes along; that includes a smile and a good word. You’ll be blessed by the act of kindness. Thanks Belinda for bringing up this growing national epidemic.

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18 Belinda December 16, 2010 at 4:06 pm

Thank you for sharing your experience with us, Michael. I can only imagine what it must’ve been like for you. And thank you for making a point to let us know that even a smile and a good word are acts of kindness because there are times, especially these days, when that’s all some of us can afford to give.

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19 rob white December 16, 2010 at 7:59 am

Another gem, Belinda. We are all part of one universal whole… that man or woman on the street is all of us.

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20 dustus December 16, 2010 at 10:20 am

Harrowing time of year to be out on the streets, especially where I live and where I grew up. The final stanza mentioning bitter sweet is apt—makes me think the hot cocoa from the first line; sweet at first, bitter once one thinks about the holidays for many others. Great poetry; a socially conscious reminder. Cheers, Belinda.

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21 Rudri December 16, 2010 at 1:38 pm

I like how you mingle cheer with sadness. It is the holiday season, but there are people who are hurting and are helpless to change their plight. It’s about awareness and your poetry elevates us to think beyond our own lives. Thank You.

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22 Victoria December 16, 2010 at 5:22 pm

Powerful, thought-provoking poem. You paint this warm cozy picture then throw open the doors to the cold reality of homelessness. I live in a nice neighborhood by the Truckee River. This morning I heard that they broke up a homless camp probably not a mile away. You have tackled this issue in a most effective way, Belinda. Thanks for your comments on my poem as well.
Victoria

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23 Marci December 17, 2010 at 10:58 am

Lovely words, powerful impact. I can’t imagine what it be like to have my “life in a cart.” Thank you for the reminder of how good most of us have it and to not forget those who don’t share this with us.

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